Taking In The Sunrise On The Top of Masada & Dead Sea

The Sunrise On The Top of Masada & Dead Sea

HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF MASADA

 

I love a historical destination with a great story, and that’s exactly what Masada provides. Masada’s legacy is shared primarily through details  provided by Jewish historian Josephus Flavius, the commander of the Jewish forces during the First Jewish-Roman War from 66-73 AD who made it his mission to share Masada’s tragic ending.

Visiting Masada, the ancient fortress built atop a mountain plateau in modern day Israel, is a life-changing experience. No caveats necessary.

There’s simply nothing like visiting an ancient mountaintop fortress that overlooks the Dead Sea. It doesn’t feel real. But because of its isolation and the arid desert climate, the fortress once occupied by King Herod is a remarkably well-preserved relic of humanity’s ancient past, one you can climb to on the same paths used by visiting dignitaries and invading Roman troops.

Masada was most likely built between 37 and 31 BC by Herod the Great. While Josephus’ writings claim Hasmonean king Alexander Janeus built the site decades earlier, there is no architectural evidence that any type of construction was built earlier than Herod’s fortress. Herod ordered the development of the fortress because its geographical position made it a terrific strategic location for him. Masada sits on a plateau that is part of a cliff jetting more than 1,300 feet into the air. Around Masada are smaller but difficult to navigate cliffs with only three narrow paths leading to its gates. From the fortress Herod would be able to see enemies approaching from long distances, and the limited access served as an additional level of protection.

 

Two events defined Masada between 66 and 74 AD: the Great Revolt and the Siege of Masada. Prior to 66 AD Masada was controlled by the Romans, as it had been since Herod the Great ruled there. The Great Revolt of the Jews against the Romans was led by Eleazar Ben Yair and the Sicarii. The Sicarii were a group of Jewish extremists who fled from Jerusalem and ultimately settled at Masada after taking possession of it following the Great Revolt. More and more of the Sicarii relocated to Masada in the years after the revolt as they were run out of Jerusalem due to ongoing conflicts with other Jewish groups.

 

By 72 AD, Masada had become the last Sicarii stronghold in the region and home to almost 1,000 people. With plans to take the fortress back, the Romans constructed a wall and built camps around Masada; they also built a ramp and a tower with a battering ram to breach the walls. As it became clear that the Romans siege would succeed and the Sicarii would be either enslaved or killed, Eleazar Ben Yair delivered speeches to his people and convinced them it would be better to die in honor than it would be to surrender and live in shame and humiliation. Judaism prohibits suicide, and so a small number of people were selected to murder almost the entire community, ensuring only one final volunteer would have to commit suicide. When the Romans arrived, they found the Sicarii destroyed everything except for food, which presumably they intentionally saved to prove they died not of starvation but because they chose to sacrifice themselves. According to Josephus in The War of the Jews, VII:

“[The Romans] were at a loss to conjecture what had happened here, encountering the mass of slain. Instead of exulting as over enemies, they admired the nobility of their resolve and the contempt of death display by so many carrying it, unwavering, into execution.”

Not all stories have a happy ending.

Masada’s history since the Siege has been far quieter with significantly less bloodshed. The Romans stayed there only through the 2nd century AD, after which time a Byzantine monastery was founded in the 5th century and abandoned just two centuries later. Masada was rediscovered in the 19th century, with explorations and excavations marking much of the last 100 years. Today, Masada is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

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THE DEAD SEA

The Dead Sea, known in Hebrew as Yam Ha-Melakh (the Sea of Salt) is the lowest point on earth, surrounded by the stunning landscape of the Negev Desert. The shores of the Dead Sea are the lowest point on the surface of the earth, and the saline water of the lake give lead to the name because no fish can survive in the salty waters. The other result of the salty water is their renowned health and healing properties and the unique feature that one can float naturally in them.

The Dead Sea represents the lowest elevation  on Earth; it stands more than 1,400 feet below sea level. Herod the Great once used it as a health destination, as the salt and minerals from the water carry some solid health benefits. To this day many people flock to its shores to float, cover themselves in mud, or simply admire it. Those shores are a little harder to reach each year; they have been receding for decades, which is causing an environmental impact on the surrounding region. This is in part due to large sinkholes that have formed in its vicinity, which impacts the rate at which groundwater is replaced by freshwater—freshwater is a primary factor in the receding shorelines. While plans are in place to restore the balance, success is not guaranteed. Not far from the Dead Sea are the Qumran Caves, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found; although you likely won’t stop and won’t have the chance to visit them, most tours will point them out as you drive past them.

Experiencing the Dead Sea is pretty straightforward. In some ways it’s a lot like visiting a beach; you can pick a spot with a chair or two, unload your belongings, and head into the water. From there, it’s a swim unlike any other you may have taken before. As soon as I waded into the water I could feel the salt water pushing my body up, and it took some effort to keep my feet on the sea floor. Once Adam and I were waist-deep, we submerged a bit and really felt the water’s efforts to force us into a floating position. I love to swim; I have dived into the warm waters off the coast of Bermuda and Florida’s Tarpon Springs, and I have cannonballed into the icy Southern Ocean in Antarctica. Floating in the Dead Sea was nothing like those experiences. The water was exceptionally hot—almost uncomfortable as we stood ankle-deep and started our walk out to deeper sections—and it’s not really designed for swimming. Given how it pushes you up to the surface, it’s best to just let the water do what it does best and force you into a relaxing floating position. We were happy to enjoy the sensation for a little while, smiling as we heard similar exclamations and observations from fellow travelers around us. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience that is a great way to end a day trip in Israel!

 

Mihran Kalaydjian Playing I wish I could hide her and not let anyone talk to her

 

I said I love you and that’s forever
And this I promise from the heart
I could not love you any better
I love you just the way you are.”

LYRICS:

I wish I could hide her and not let anyone talk to her

Ill let her drink my tears, and present her my heart with my hands

And take from my life and give it to her

I wish she knew how much I love her, and how much her love is causing me pain

Oh heart go bring me her heart, i’m going to melt if I stay thinking of her

And ill take from my life and give it to her

I wish she knew how much I pray so that I can just catch a glimpse of her

This problem needs a solution, I need to go talk to her

And Ill take from my life and give it to her

7 Destinations in Europe You Wouldn’t Think to Visit (but Really Should)

Vence, FranceAnia Kropelka/Getty Images
As one of the most accessible and beloved parts of the world, Europe is home to plenty bucket list–worthy places. History will draw you to ancient cities like Rome, Athens, and Lisbon, while culinary feats on nearly every corner call from Paris and London. And we can’t forget the rolling, robust lands of Ireland and Scotland. It could take a lifetime to fully immerse yourself in every destination.

While these iconic stops are definitely worth your attention, there are others that might not have as much search traffic, but can give you a whole new perspective on a place and its people. These little-known wonders — most of which are not-so-far from larger metropolitan areas — will add depth and dimension to your getaway, offering a unique opportunity to see and experience something beyond the usual circuit.

Below, seven underappreciated European gems you need to know about.

Erisksay Island, Outer Hebrides, ScotlandGetty Images

Scotland’s Outer Hebrides

Scotland’s Skye and the Hebrides snagged the seventh spot in this year’s World’s Best Islands in Europe ranking, but the former is arguably the most popular with travelers. Take a ferry ride beyond the Isle of Skye to explore what’s considered to be one of Europe’s last natural habits, the Outer Hebrides. This collection of islands — the largest being the Isles of Lewis, Harris, and North and South Uist — offers a full immersion into Celtic history, heritage, and charm.

You can hear locals speaking or singing in Gaelic, marvel at medieval churches, and see Neolithic standing stones up close. On Harris, where tweed fabric was originally woven, local artisans continue to craft capes, bags, and more traditional goods with the makings of an excellent souvenir. To visit, carve out your own schedule or book one of the many the tours that explore this region. This 11-day, 10-night optionthis link opens in a new tab from CIE Tours International includes whiskey tasting, beach hopping, and more. Depending on the season, you’ll want to pack layers, as summers can be ideal beach weather, but winters are often unforgiving.

Sardinia, ItalyManuel Breva Colmeiro/Getty Images

Sardinia, Italy

The expansive island of Sardinia is just an hour-long flight away from Rome. If you’ve ever been to the Algarve on Portugal’s southern coast, you might recognize the jagged — and breathtaking — landscape that defines Sardinia’s 1,200 miles of coastline, blending beaches into mountains. There are two special qualities that set this destination apart from others: its Bronze Age stone ruins that look like beehives and its microclimate. Thanks to the headland behind Santa Margherita di Pula, which shields the coast from cold north winds, this region has 300 days of sunshine. Though it’s lovely to visit from March through December, June and July will give you the warmest ocean temperatures. For a luxe, beachfront stay, book the Forte Village Resortthis link opens in a new tab in Santa Margherita di Pula.

Getty Images

Thessaloniki, Greece

On your next trip to Greece, hop on an hour-long flight from Athens to spend a few days in the country’s “second city,” Thessaloniki. This Northern port offers plenty for history lovers, but it’s also got a modern liveliness to it. You can wander through ruins from the Romans, the Byzantines, and the Ottomans — thanks to its numerous occupations — and then make your way to Valaoritou Street for stylish cocktail bars and plenty of music. Since the heart of the city was entirely rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1917, the 20th-century architecture of this area will feel far away from the traditional Greek vibe. The city is also popular with locals because the beaches are also less crowded than on the islands. Don’t miss White Tower, Roman Forum, and the cobblestone streets of the historic quarter, Ano Polithis link opens in a new tab.

Belgrade, Serbia

Belgrade, Serbia

If you’ve already experienced the bath scene in Budapest, danced ’til dawn at the infamous five-story club in Prague, and ordered just-one-more cocktail while admiring the moonlit sea in Dubrovnik, set your sights on a lesser-known party destination: Belgrade. The capital of Serbia is becoming quite the watering hole for young travelers who, thanks to its many teeming bars and restaurants (and coffee shops to wake you up when morning comes). Here, you can experience splavovi — splav, for short — floating lounges anchored along the Danube and Sava rivers, each featuring a different musical genre. These tend to rage every night of the week, but if you need a break, make sure to see Beogradska Tvrđava, the historical fortress representing the city’s part in the Ottoman, Serbian, Austrian, Byzantine and Roman empires.

Chiara Salvadori/Getty Images

Vicenza, Italy

You’ve heard of Venice and Verona, but a short 30- to 40-minute train ride from either of these known Italian destinations is Vicenza. Within the country’s northeastern Veneto region, you’ll be amazed by how little foot traffic this beautiful town hosts. It’s most known for its unique buildings, specifically those of 16th-century architect Palladio. If you enjoy spending hours winding through halls of art, you’ll find yourself sipping cappuccinos in between visits to the Basilica Palladiana and the Palazzo Chiericati. You might even catch a movie at the Teatro Olimpico, an outdoor theater that’s indoors. As a bonus? You can add “wandered through a UNESCO World Heritage Site” to your checklist, since the longstanding value and importance of the architecture in this town earned it a nod. If your budget allows, consider staying for a long weekend where you can talk about the beauty you’ve witnessed over wine al fresco at the Villa Valmarana Ai Nanithis link opens in a new tab.

Christine Phillips/Getty Images

Ljubljana, Slovenia

Though small in size, Slovenia is big on personality, led by its diverse and robust capital, Ljubljana. As a college town, you might find a younger crowd here, but they bring plenty of outdoor cafes along the river. Here you can stroll through plenty of green patches, most notably Tivoli Parkthis link opens in a new tab (not to be confused with the amusement park in Copenhagen). As a true melting pot squished between Italy, Croatia, and Austria, the food scene has recently become one of Europe’s most intriguing. Don’t miss the tasting menu at Strelecthis link opens in a new tab and the pastries at Zvezdathis link opens in a new tab. When you’re in town, book your stay at the Intercontinental Ljubljanathis link opens in a new tab and ask for a top floor in this 20-story high hotel, so you can wake up to one of the city’s best views.

Ania Kropelka/Getty Images

Vence, France

It’s hard not to fall for the refined charisma of France — from the quaint, streetside cafes of Paris to the glittering grape vines of Bordeaux. But if you want to go off the grid? Head 45 minutes east of Cannes to find Vence, a small commune in the hills of the Alpes Maritimes. You might want to speak French, or at least attempt, when you pull into to this town, which is known for its landscape and the luxury destination spa at the Chateau Saint-Martin & Spathis link opens in a new tab. You may also want to pack your watercolor palette, as inspiration struck for many an artist — Picasso and Matisse, namely — in this idyllic Côte D’Azur perch.

The USA’s 13 Coolest College Towns (Did Yours Make the List?)

Back to school is seriously cool in these scholarly destinations. With food, nightlife, and art scenes that are anything but elementary, these 13 spots are the best college towns in the U.S. to visit this fall.

Trip Ideas tree outdoor sky green Nature grass plant public space leisure lawn urban area park daytime leaf campus City recreation neighbourhood Garden landscape town square urban design metropolitan area tourism estate plaza spring landscaping walkway Playground day

Trip Ideas tree outdoor grass habitat Forest Nature path green trail wilderness woodland vegetation natural environment wood wooded ecosystem old growth forest walking plant leaf temperate broadleaf and mixed forest woody plant rainforest autumn sunlight deciduous Jungle temperate coniferous forest ridge biome stream area dirt lush  Trip Ideas grass outdoor tree sky leaf Nature autumn woody plant estate public space plant campus neighbourhood lawn red house residential area real estate landscape City Garden park home shrub walkway landscaping spring asphalt suburb facade maple tree way residential plantation sidewalk

  1. Eugene, Oregon

Nike gives Eugene serious athletic cache—just look at the fashion-statement uniforms the Oregon Ducks unveil every season or the state-of-the-art sporting facilities on campus. It’s also where frat-bro favorite Animal House was filmed and home to New Max’s Tavern, the inspiration for Homer’s famed hangout Moe’s Tavern on The Simpsons. Willamette Street is lined with art galleries like White Lotus, which showcases Asian works, and Sattva Gallery, where local artists display handcrafted ceramics and jewelry. Bonus: Portland is only a two-hour drive away.

 

Trip Ideas outdoor sky landmark cityscape City Town night human settlement evening tourism tower vacation skyline Downtown dusk Beach Resort

Secret Getaways Trip Ideas building sky outdoor urban area neighbourhood Architecture facade Downtown plaza sign   Trip Ideas landmark Town City neighbourhood street Downtown night metropolis metropolitan area evening building mixed use facade marketplace   Trip Ideas light water street darkness lighting night underwater concert stage special effects computer wallpaper midnight rock concert dark

2. Athens, Georgia

Athens is an incubator for artists and rock musicians—R.E.M and the B-52’s got their start here—and it oozes southern charm with its historic Georgian mansions in the Five Points neighborhood. Two music venues are the heart of the nightlife scene: 40 Watts Club, the legendary spot for big-name acts; and Georgia Theatre, which reopened in 2011 after a fire (the Grammy Award-winning and local group Zach Brown Band donated $250,000 to bring it back to life). Fun fact: Sanford Stadium at the University of Georgia doubles as a pet cemetery; every English bulldog mascot since 1956 is entombed in wall mausoleum near Gate 9.

Trip Ideas building outdoor City road urban area metropolitan area neighbourhood street Downtown way Town sidewalk mixed use car lane tree pedestrian daytime metropolis residential area vehicle condominium plant recreation apartment building

Trip Ideas indoor person ceiling Living restaurant room Entertainment lighting Bar people night interior design darkness   Trip Ideas outdoor sky scene metropolitan area way road skyline cityscape City transport metropolis urban area human settlement highway horizon night Downtown skyscraper evening residential area dusk traffic infrastructure controlled access highway Sunset public transport distance

3. Minneapolis, Minnesota

Minneapolis may not have the distinct curb appeal of LA, NYC, or Boston, but the major city does have a pretty sick Frank Gehry-designed landmark that earns them major bragging rights. The Weisman Art Museum, a monolithic stainless steel page out of the famed architect’s book, sits on a bluff over the Mississippi, sprawling out on the U of M campus. Follow the college crowd and at some point or another, you’ll wind up in Dinkytown (yes, that’s its actual name) – a tiny neighborhood overflowing with restaurants (look past the chains for eclectic indies like the Kitty Cat Klub), bars, specialty stores and theaters.

 

Budget Trip Ideas cup table coffee Drink glass beer alcoholic beverage food beverage   Trip Ideas tree Forest grass woodland ecosystem path outdoor spruce fir forest grove nature reserve old growth forest wilderness tropical and subtropical coniferous forests vegetation temperate coniferous forest plant wood temperate broadleaf and mixed forest northern hardwood forest concept biome riparian forest wooded state park trail valdivian temperate rain forest deciduous rainforest trunk Jungle landscape area  Food + Drink Jetsetter Guides Offbeat Travel Trends Trip Ideas person cup food Drink coffee cup wooden caffeine coffee espresso hand flavor beverage

Trip Ideas outdoor sky Nature Coast water Sea body of water shore coastal and oceanic landforms Beach headland mountain promontory Ocean terrain cliff bay sand cape cove wave sandy

4. Santa Cruz, California

Massive swells, redwood-filled forests, an abundant haze of “medical” marijuana—it’s easy to see the appeal of Santa Cruz. Along with miles of misty beaches and endless bike trails that run through the nearby mountains, the city has killer microbrew and coffee scenes. Two standouts: the organic suds at Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing, in the Swift Street Courtyard, and single-origin promoter Verve Coffee Roasters, which has locations scattered around town.

Trip Ideas grass outdoor building tree landmark structure estate classical architecture outdoor structure facade Courtyard pavilion gazebo  Trip Ideas outdoor tree building mixed use urban area City neighbourhood daytime advertising metropolitan area real estate facade sky street house signage condominium

Road Trips Trip Ideas tree outdoor City Town urban area landmark street scene Downtown infrastructure sky neighbourhood metropolitan area road way pedestrian town square car sidewalk metropolis mixed use lane daytime plaza tourist attraction plant recreation tourism house

5. Madison, Wisconsin

Madison’s historic downtown is perfectly situated on an isthmus flanked by the Mendota and Monona lakes, with the 1,200-acre Arboretum and various biking trails nearby. But make no mistake, Madtown is a tailgaters paradise (game day favorite: fried cheese curds). Ask a Wisconsin grad about his alma matter and he’ll tell you the following: the Kollege Klubon Saturdays, Dotty’s for the Melting Pot burger, and the Terrace at Memorial Union for snapshot-worthy water views.

Trip Ideas tree outdoor grass ecosystem vegetation nature reserve wilderness spruce fir forest temperate broadleaf and mixed forest tropical and subtropical coniferous forests old growth forest Forest plant temperate coniferous forest woodland biome valdivian temperate rain forest riparian forest wetland bog path shrubland deciduous Lake plant community water larch swamp national park rainforest landscape northern hardwood forest concept hillside surrounded lush wooded

Trip Ideas tree outdoor water sky Nature River body of water natural environment reflection shore morning vacation landscape Lake Sea Sunset evening dusk setting surrounded wooded Trip Ideas water outdoor sky Sunset horizon Sea fishing cloud morning evening dusk sunrise Ocean sunlight dawn silhouette Trip Ideas outdoor mountain tree Nature sky mountainous landforms habitat geographical feature landform hill wilderness mountain range hillside ecosystem plant Forest ridge green season leaf woody plant autumn landscape valley meadow rural area alps lush Lake mountain pass plateau temperate coniferous forest overlooking grassy pasture highland land

6. Bozeman, Montana

Who would have guessed that one of America’s coolest college towns is the middle of cow-country Montana? Bozeman, home to Montana State University, has been drawing more and more visitors north. In summer, there’s world-class fishing at the nearby Madison and Yellowstone rivers; come winter, snow junkies flock to Bridger and Big Sky resorts. The town itself has a laid-back college vibe, with bistros, galleries and watering holes like Molly Brown bar, a note-perfect dive in the “bar-muda triangle.”

Trip Ideas Nature Waterfall water outdoor rock wall Ruins reflection water feature autumn ancient history terrain cliff stream geology stone            Trip Ideas person outdoor night evening meal restaurant Bar people crowd

Trip Ideas sky grass outdoor estate campus City real estate tree national trust for places of historic interest or natural beauty cloud stately home university mansion building land lot landscape

7. Ithaca, NY

Ithaca may weed out a few (hundred) prospective students each year with the promise of a brutal winter and somewhat middle-of-nowhere locale (it’s 4+ hours from NYC), but the picturesque city is a hell of a lot more than blizzard country. First and foremost, Ithaca topples the scenic scale with rolling hillsides, more than 150 cascading waterfalls (hence all the “Ithaca is GORGES!” merch) and winding trails. Extremely walkable, and home to a generous handful of breweries and wineries, the town also maintains a young crowd, with a population that’s more than 50 percent college kiddos thanks to Ithaca College and a place you probably haven’t heard of–Cornell.

Trip Ideas ground outdoor tree landmark estate stately home Architecture mansion campus wall sidewalk daytime brick building grass house college sky facade university real estate road surface park historic site symmetry Courtyard graffiti way painted walkway paving

Trip Ideas tree grass outdoor leaf Nature autumn park home house plant residential area estate spring neighbourhood real estate maple tree deciduous cottage branch landscape Garden facade mansion outdoor structure shrub landscaping suburb        Trip Ideas tree outdoor sky grass metropolitan area City urban area landmark bird's eye view residential area leaf daytime suburb cityscape plant real estate tower block aerial photography skyline estate green metropolis land lot landscape road park Garden horizon urban design lush hillside

8. Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Chapel Hill might have the strongest foodie cred of any college town in the country. Here, sports bar nachos and divey burger joints take a back seat to James Beard-nominated chefs like Andrea Reusing, whose Asian-inflected Lantern sources from local farms; and the Pig, a nose-to-tail Carolina-style barbecue joint that’s perennially packed. Beyond food, there are plenty more diversions, from the Carolina Basketball Museum to the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Trip Ideas mountain outdoor sky grass Nature mountainous landforms tree highland field woody plant wilderness hill rural area background leaf cloud Village morning grassland mountain range landscape hill station mount scenery meadow plant plain Farm pasture green fell national park valley escarpment Winter Ranch lush bushes distance hillside Trip Ideas outdoor building way ground scene street Town pedestrian urban area neighbourhood infrastructure public space sidewalk City road Downtown tree shopping recreation lane tourism  Trip Ideas grass outdoor sky field building estate tree house home stately home lawn mansion flower Garden palace autumn château manor house plantation

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9. Charlottesville, Virginia

Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia in 1819 and his legacy lives on, from the grand 18th-century buildings to the secret societies like Seven and Z. In addition to a surprisingly cool art scene ⎯ check out art collective C’ville Arts⎯ lively restaurants (we love the rustic-chic C and O ) and the open-air pavilion on the Downtown Mall, one of the country’s emerging wine regions is right outside of town, shadowed by the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Trip Ideas tree outdoor water River reflection Nature leaf pond bank Lake wetland sky landscape bridge reservoir plant watercourse bayou fluvial landforms of streams autumn branch floodplain grass riparian zone creek traveling surrounded bushes wooded Trip Ideas building sky road outdoor scene Town street way neighbourhood City mixed use Downtown sidewalk night evening residential area real estate home metropolitan area town square estate metropolis cityscape lane facade street light plaza

Trip Ideas Weekend Getaways sky outdoor City urban area Town landmark neighbourhood building Architecture residential area house Downtown tree facade real estate metropolitan area home roof mixed use window apartment metropolis evening plaza estate street condominium apartment building

10. Burlington, Vermont

Burlington’s granola roots run deep. This is the place Ben and Jerry bestowed their psychedelic flavors on the world, and where a generation of LSD-charged roadies discovered Phish. These days an organic food movement and highly acclaimed craft beer scene have taken hold in and around UVM. See it firsthand at the City Market, where local purveyors hawk everything from freshly brewed kombucha to high-point ciders to pasture-raised pork.

Trip Ideas tree outdoor ground house property home estate building neighbourhood residential area mansion cottage backyard Villa real estate Courtyard facade yard farmhouse plant area trailer shade  Trip Ideas indoor floor ceiling room interior design restaurant furniture area Shop

Trip Ideas building outdoor sky landmark Town tower night Architecture dusk evening metropolitan area metropolis City tourist attraction cloud facade estate tree palace mansion house château town square cityscape sign

11. Oxford, Mississippi

Home to William Faulkner’s 19th-century estate Rowan Oak, the storied paperback palace Square Books, and chef John Currence’s destination Cajun spot City Grocery, Oxford is the quintessential Southern small town. The magnolia-lined streets have added luxury boutiques and new-wave restaurants in recent years, but original treasures remain ⎯ Neilson’s, for instance, is the oldest department store in the South. The hotel of choice: the Z, a classic B&B run by two twenty-something Ole Miss-alum sisters. Don’t miss their breakfast cheddar biscuits.

Trip Ideas outdoor tree building road carriage Town landmark street drawn house estate vacation tourism pulling home château place of worship Church horse-drawn vehicle cart

12. Williamsburg, Virginia

Cheesy historical reenactments have long defined Williamsburg, but a growing arts district is giving the town of William & Mary College a polished new edge. Don’t miss the Sculpture Gallery, a public art initiative that features 21 pieces from East Coast artists, including terra cotta works by Barbara Kobylinska, and Century Art Gallery, a showcase for contemporary paintings inside a 1920 Sears Roebuck house. And if you do happen to enjoy colonial history, visit the Jamestown Settlement, eat at one of the many 18th-century-style taverns, or take a tour of the Berkeley Plantation.

Trip Ideas tree grass outdoor sky Nature stately home landmark estate woody plant park mansion campus building daytime national trust for places of historic interest or natural beauty château plant manor house lawn Garden palace university college listed building home house facade real estate landscape plantation historic house almshouse City medieval architecture stone square  Trip Ideas grass tree outdoor Nature nature reserve reflection water waterway bank vegetation bridge riparian zone pond wetland leaf watercourse River bayou green riparian forest biome state park creek floodplain landscape Lake Canal plant lush Forest area surrounded wooded

Trip Ideas sky outdoor building metropolitan area road City transport landmark neighbourhood metropolis urban area street Downtown Town cityscape plaza human settlement Architecture residential area shopping mall skyline skyscraper tower block public transport town square way

13. Ann Arbor, Michigan

Football season in Ann Arbor is no joke—just ask the University of Michigan team, who basically acquire star status every September. For non-collegiates and non-sportifs, life is still pretty swell with post-grad job prospects at big name companies like Google AdWords and Toyota making the town a comfy locale for former co-eds. Plus, pair all that with a bustling downtown–say hello to a multitude of late-night bites and plenty of beer at local faves like Ashley’s—and residential charm courtesy of tree-lined streets and Ann Arbor just about has it all.

 

Mihran Kalaydjian Playing One Akriti (Image)

Mihran Kalaydjian Playing One Akriti (Image)

Mihran Kalaydjian And His Element Band Playing One Akriti (Image)

Song: One Akriti (Image)
Label: Alligator Records
Executive Producer: Elias Khoury
Director: Bedros ZADORIAN
Location: Del Mar, CA

http://www.mihrankalaydjianpiano.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MihranKalayd

Mino Element Band Members

Aram Kasabian – Lead Guitar
Sevan Manoukian – Drummer
Hratch Panossian – Bass
Samer Khoury – Violin
Tony Amer – Saxophone
Haim Cohen – KeyBoard
Albert Panikian – Trumpet
Nicole Del Sol – Percussion
Dana Debos – Trombone

Lyrics:

There are a thousand dreams
In this world to be turned into reality
There are a thousand souls
In this world seeking the way to spirituality

There are a thousand doors
In this world unlocking the most promising creations
There are a thousand roads
In this world leading to desired destinations

There are a thousand hearts
In this world beating for whom they admire
There are a thousand ambitions
In this world keeping ignited the inner fire

But all it takes is One
One dream to give you what you wanted
One soul who reaches the ultimate goal
One door to the future you always wanted
One road to reach the place where you belong
One heart to make you feel loved
One ambition to make you feel strong
Sometimes that one completes you as whole

Mihran Kalaydjian One Akriti (Image)
© 2015 Paramount Studios All Rights Reserved

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 

TO MY SON – Mihran Kalaydjian and Charlie Bisharat SPECIAL MELODY

Mihran Kalaydjian and Charlie Bisharat – MY SON

Honor Guest: Violinist: Charlie Bisharat

Recorded: Feb 23, 2015

Record Label: Alligator Records

Charlie Bisharat is a Grammy-winning violinist who has toured and/or recorded with numerous notable artists. He was a member of Shadowfax, who won a Best New Age Performance Grammy in 1988 for Folksongs for a Nuclear Village

A version of the Classical Greek song “Gie mou”My Son”, written by the composer Apostolos Kaldaras and sung originally by Stamatis Kokotas (Greece).

Mino Element Band Members

Aram Kasabian – Lead Guitar
Sevan Manoukian – Drummer
Hratch Panossian – Bass
Samer Khoury – Violin
Tony Amer – Saxophone
Haim Cohen – KeyBoard
Albert Panikian – Trumpet
Nicole Del Sol – Percussion
Dana Debos – Trombone

Lyrics:

My son, it’s my pain unbearable dear
to see you as xerofyllo wind
in life chased turning

My son, did not hear your devious father
drifted and day by day
Being twenty years old and yet grow old

My son, what do you expect, my IP
in a muddy road
you’ll be always like a tree uprooted
without destiny, without sun and sky

My son, my yearning to Reflect
Come home to sweeten your wound
My son, my son, how I hurt

My son, it ‘s my people cruel dear
the lords it ‘merchants of war
and laugh when we tear rolls

My son, do not think anyone my beloved
as though your friends rejoiced, my God
that You ‘ve now fallen so low

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Love Is…

Love is…

Love is feeling cold in the back of vans

Love is a fanclub with only two fans

Love is walking holding paintstained hands

Love is.

Love is fish and chips on winter nights

Love is blankets full of strange delights

Love is when you don’t put out the light

Love is

Love is the presents in Christmas shops

Love is when you’re feeling Top of the Pops

Love is what happens when the music stops

Love is

Love is white panties lying all forlorn

Love is pink nightdresses still slightly warm

Love is when you have to leave at dawn

Love is

Love is you and love is me

Love is prison and love is free

Love’s what’s there when you are away from me

Love is… 

 

The Unknowable

The Unknowable

Who had children. Who died.
Who found himself lucky after thirty years
and stumbling home realised
it was a simple error.
Who ruled behind the scenes in the Department of Misinformation,
who was later conscripted
to underwrite Armageddon.
Whose hand was lost in a sawmill
and was met again as the strange dust
of a new-found galaxy.
Who migrated to the other world
but came home to bury the dog.
Who divorced and died of alcoholism
in the country town where destiny misplaced him.
Who topped high school, failed everything else
twice, married money, then slept through
the death of three children.
Who was invisible, became a wall, became a street,
entered real estate, bought a city,
retired into owning world opinion.
Who saw his son indicted for reluctance, shackled and maimed,
blamed for the colour of the sky.
Who inscribed his name in the old script,
the one no one reads anymore,
the one where things inscribe themselves
so what they are
reads itself back
in us.
Who was my shadow when daylight was. 

Besame Mucho

Kiss me, kiss me a lot,
As if tonight were the last time
Kiss me, kiss me a lot,
For I’m scared to lose you, to lose you afterwards

I want to feel you very close, see myself in your eyes, see you near me
Think that maybe tomorrow I’ll already be far, very far away from you